Heads up everyone that has used "Driver Sweeper" to clean up ATI drivers from your Windows 7 system.
Published on January 23, 2011 By CarGuy1 In Personal Computing

If you run Windows 7 and have ever used a program called "Driver Sweeper" to clean up a problem with your ATI (AMD) video card driver installation, you may be in for a big surprise when you attempt to install Windows 7 SP1 when it is released in a few days.

Apparently Driver Sweeper deletes (cleans up) entries and files for ATI video drivers that are actually part of the original Windows 7 install package.  When you attempt to install Win 7 SP1, the installer finds that these entries and files are missing and fails with an error code 0x800f0a13.

The Author of Driver Sweeper has released a fix for this problem and it can be found here.


Comments
on Jan 23, 2011

on Jan 23, 2011

It did the same sort of thing with nVidia prior to SP1.  It was when the 260 drivers came out I believe.  A friend on another forum posted a 'fix' file.

 

on Jan 23, 2011

when it is released in a few days

What is your Microsoft source for that information. It isn't being released in a few days, 1st Quarter of 2011 is the target date.

on Jan 23, 2011

So let me get this straight, Microsoft expect us to believe that one little irrelevant problem manages to be such an intrigal part of the whole OP update that the whole process fails??

on Jan 24, 2011

Mystikmind
So let me get this straight, Microsoft expect us to believe that one little irrelevant problem manages to be such an intrigal part of the whole OP update that the whole process fails??

So what do you want them to do? If it finds a screwed up Win 7 install (which sounds like what this cleaner app did, screw up the original install), to figure out how screwed up it is before trying to figure out if it can apply the update? It seems perfectly reasonable for MS to not do this.

on Jan 24, 2011

on Jan 24, 2011

Annatar11

Quoting Mystikmind, reply 4So let me get this straight, Microsoft expect us to believe that one little irrelevant problem manages to be such an intrigal part of the whole OP update that the whole process fails??
So what do you want them to do? If it finds a screwed up Win 7 install (which sounds like what this cleaner app did, screw up the original install), to figure out how screwed up it is before trying to figure out if it can apply the update? It seems perfectly reasonable for MS to not do this.

 

Yea but how difficult is it for Microsoft to anticipate that few operating systems will be in perfect health after running for some time on peoples computers? In the past, i have been able to fix some shockingly sick operating systems with updates! So why are things suddenly different now?

I am saying all this because the OP has an operating system that is still perfectly functional, and if it is working, then why not the update? It is like saying that the engine in my car cannot be fixed because the rear tail light is out!!

on Jan 24, 2011

The problem here is not Microsoft but the Driver vendors.  If you uninstall their drivers they ususally left crap behind.  This could cause problems on newer installatons of the drivers.  People developed driver cleaner programs to reqally clean the driver installations.  The usually needed to be check against new driver releases to make sure the vendor did not add or delete any files.

Win 7 is born and with trying to make things easier certain files were added to the OS for people to boot up with a decent display and then install full drivers from there.  There are a basic set of drivers for AMD and nVidia in every OS install and if those are missing can cause the system not to boot and a repair will be required.  Driver removers started by doing wildcard searches for specific patterns in specific directories.  Those rules no longer apply and they not have to be more specific in what they will remove.  It has even caused nVidia to add a clean install option to their newest drivers which should have been the responsibility of AMD and nVidia from thr start.

 

 

on Jan 24, 2011

Tarkus01
The problem here is not Microsoft but the Driver vendors.  If you uninstall their drivers they ususally left crap behind.  This could cause problems on newer installatons of the drivers.  People developed driver cleaner programs to reqally clean the driver installations.  The usually needed to be check against new driver releases to make sure the vendor did not add or delete any files.

Win 7 is born and with trying to make things easier certain files were added to the OS for people to boot up with a decent display and then install full drivers from there.  There are a basic set of drivers for AMD and nVidia in every OS install and if those are missing can cause the system not to boot and a repair will be required.  Driver removers started by doing wildcard searches for specific patterns in specific directories.  Those rules no longer apply and they not have to be more specific in what they will remove.  It has even caused nVidia to add a clean install option to their newest drivers which should have been the responsibility of AMD and nVidia from thr start.

 

I wouldn't disagree specifically with anything here but to say that since Microsoft basically have a monopoly on operating systems, it should not all be to their benefit, having a monopoly has to mean they must have some obligation for the intricacies of peripheral software/hardware. This is what provides people such as myself with some degree of justification in our complaints..... it's a gray area!

on Jan 24, 2011

It's not 'gray' at all.  SP1 is an add-on ...an updater, not a repairer.  If it finds an error in the OS to which it is being applied the only responsible option is for it to halt until such error is corrected so as not to potentially exacerbate it [the error].

The 'origin' of the fault is with the Driver Company, not MS, and MS is not THEIR 'support' department.

They [MS] are less of a 'monopoly' than Apple is within their own machines/systems.  Were they a 'monopoly' they would both restrict Vid card choice to ONE and write all the drivers themselves.

So....no 'obligation' at all.

 

on Jan 24, 2011


It's not 'gray' at all.  SP1 is an add-on ...an updater, not a repairer.  If it finds an error in the OS to which it is being applied the only responsible option is for it to halt until such error is corrected so as not to potentially exacerbate it [the error].

The 'origin' of the fault is with the Driver Company, not MS, and MS is not THEIR 'support' department.

They [MS] are less of a 'monopoly' than Apple is within their own machines/systems.  Were they a 'monopoly' they would both restrict Vid card choice to ONE and write all the drivers themselves.

So....no 'obligation' at all.

 

 

Ok... but then how come past updaters have repaired a whole range of nasty shit - i have seen this with my own eyes? Is it just the luck of the draw or has microsoft started making updates too touchy feely?

 

Apple.... Hmph, Don't even get me started on those guys, Please!!

on Jan 24, 2011

The sort of 'repairs' that a MS SP are likely to deal with are the ones MS has found as flaws/failings in the OS release, not necessarily something a third party programmer may have introduced.... simply because there are way too many diverse and creative ways that they [the third party programmers] AND the individual user may have screwed up the OS.

Afterall.... how many LiteSTEP users have seen the message "OS not found. You must re-install Windows."?  [I did once...but I think I got away with it]...

on Jan 24, 2011


The sort of 'repairs' that a MS SP are likely to deal with are the ones MS has found as flaws/failings in the OS release, not necessarily something a third party programmer may have introduced.... simply because there are way too many diverse and creative ways that they [the third party programmers] AND the individual user may have screwed up the OS.

Afterall.... how many LiteSTEP users have seen the message "OS not found. You must re-install Windows."?  [I did once...but I think I got away with it]...

 

Hope your right.... i would not like to see a deliberate trend develop whereby Microsoft start making their updates more 'sensitive' for various strategic reasons.

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