Published on October 17, 2009 By CarGuy1 In Personal Computing

I have a bit of an problem with UAC and was wondering if any of the experts in the community could help me resolve it.

I've got a few programs set to load at Windows start up and UAC refuses to let them. Speedfan, Steam, and the EVGA precision graphics tuner will not load automaticly at start up no matter what I try. I've tried putting shortcuts in the startup folder, set them to run as administrator, and setting them to start at start up within each of the programs.

Is there a way to tell UAC to ignore a program and allow it to start? Perhaps something in group policy that I'm missing?

I have a few other programs that will not run correctly with UAC also. Particle Illusion has a problem when I try to render, UAC blocks access to the project file so it will not allow it to progress. Since it's not an executible, I can't set it to run in admin mode.

If I turn UAC off, all of my issues are resolved. I was looking to leave it on with Win 7 but if it doesn't allow me to control what boots or what I can run, it's no better than Vista's version to me.

So...are there any UAC experts out there or is every one just turning it off, like in Vista?


Comments (Page 3)
on Oct 21, 2009

For example, most people know how to write security tokens and use them daily whenever a piece of software requests resources from the OS. Most people have written their own browser using protected mode. And oh, yeah, most people already know how to stop automated clicks by malware.

 

Obviously there are some things that UAC does that the average user would never do, I guess my point is.. I personally don't care what it does that I can't do for myself.. Ive had it turned off since day 1 on vista, havent had any issues whatsoever with security following the normal security precautions and using common browsing and computing sense.

 

If one is that frantic about automated malware clicks.. then by all means... leave that annoying , beeping, screen opening, extra clicking POS turned on.

 

I.. just don't need it.

 

on Oct 21, 2009

I personally don't care what it does that I can't do for myself..

Until, of course, something happens. Which hasn't happened yet for you, but for many people it has.

Ive had it turned off since day 1 on vista, havent had any issues whatsoever with security following the normal security precautions and using common browsing and computing sense.

Backwards Maxim: Most people will assume everything is secure until provided strong evidence to the contrary—exactly backwards from a reasonable approach.

I don't care how long you haven't had problems. I haven't had problems in a long time, either. But I still don't recommend scaling back on security.

Just because incidents are rare does not mean they don't happen. You personally may not be hacked, but somebody else taking your advice might be. And there's nothing saying you won't have an incident in the future, either. If you do have an incident and UAC could've prevented it, you'd be pretty embarrased.

You haven't had an incident? Great! But don't think that the bad guys simply go away, and don't think that current security practices will always be enough in the future. Stuff changes.

on Oct 21, 2009

agreed.

on Oct 21, 2009

Maybe from a different point of view may help:

I like knowing when something wants to access my system files. That's how most stuff gets in, by overwriting the system files.

If I disable UAC, how will I know if that new program I've downloaded is trying to access files it shouldn't?

BTW - with most new installers on legit software, they offer the choice between being accesible to all users or being accessible to just the current user.

If you choose to install for just the current user, many installers won't bother you with UAC.

As an added bonus, the installed software gives you a UAC prompt if malware hooks onto it, and then you can know if something is wrong.

If you're on a single user system, it's a good idea to install most stuff for just the current user. Less UAC prompts.

UAC isn't bad, especially on Windows 7, and especially with newer installers.

on Oct 21, 2009

Perhaps if MS hadn't made it so damned annoying as it prompts it wouldn't be so bad.. their clueless when it comes to the whole user experience imo... sorta like.. big govt, out of my face please 

on Oct 22, 2009
It prevents crap from installing, and it does it well. The ONLY thing crap about it is that software are allowed to request privileges, bringing up that annoying prompt. IMHO, UAC should always deny any elevation requests unless explicitly instructed otherwise by the user.
on Oct 22, 2009

try installing AC97 drivers for realtek audio device.

45mins later you've pressed allow 25 times or so, even with UAC set to off.

on Oct 22, 2009

mrlarone
try installing AC97 drivers for realtek audio device.

45mins later you've pressed allow 25 times or so, even with UAC set to off.

Well, that's likely more a flaw with the driver rather than windows 7.

on Oct 22, 2009

well perhaps (and seeing as it took 3hrs of looking for the correct driver from several similarly named ones, most likely), but it's certainly a flaw with win 7 that i can't just say 'allow everything this app does'

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