Published on October 17, 2009 By CarGuy1 In Personal Computing

I have a bit of an problem with UAC and was wondering if any of the experts in the community could help me resolve it.

I've got a few programs set to load at Windows start up and UAC refuses to let them. Speedfan, Steam, and the EVGA precision graphics tuner will not load automaticly at start up no matter what I try. I've tried putting shortcuts in the startup folder, set them to run as administrator, and setting them to start at start up within each of the programs.

Is there a way to tell UAC to ignore a program and allow it to start? Perhaps something in group policy that I'm missing?

I have a few other programs that will not run correctly with UAC also. Particle Illusion has a problem when I try to render, UAC blocks access to the project file so it will not allow it to progress. Since it's not an executible, I can't set it to run in admin mode.

If I turn UAC off, all of my issues are resolved. I was looking to leave it on with Win 7 but if it doesn't allow me to control what boots or what I can run, it's no better than Vista's version to me.

So...are there any UAC experts out there or is every one just turning it off, like in Vista?


Comments (Page 2)
on Oct 18, 2009

LightStar

Actually, the only thing Windows 7 does is allow the user to set the level of UAC.  If you turned off UAC in Windows Vista, it complained all the time.  If you turn it off in Windows 7 though, it does not mention it again once you have made your decision to do it.  Those are the only UAC changes that I know of.

The default is vastly different though.  If it believes the action was user initiated, it doesn't prompt you.  If it believes the action was program initiated, it does.

 

9009892789574% less annoying.

on Oct 18, 2009

Thanks to all.

Gary's suggestion of setting up an elevated  privilege  startup may be the solution if I want to spend more time trying to get it work. For now, I'll just leave it off.

Doc, thanks.. the Microsoft forums was the first place I looked. This is such a great community I decided I would have better results here.

I didn't bother posting the question on the MS forums because I would have gotten 10 replys on why  Win 7 's UAC is superior to Vista's, 10 counter replys to why Vista's sucks, 10 more on the pros and the 10 on the cons, 10 more discussing the creation of UAC, 10 on how it should be outlawed and Microsoft sued over putting it in, and at least 1 troll saying that if I was running Mac OS 10, I wouldn't have this problem. Out of all of the replys, maybe 1 would have a suggestion of a cure or work around.

I think Wizard had it right to begin with...

Useless AnnoyingCrap.

 

 

on Oct 18, 2009

I didn't bother posting the question on the MS forums because I would have gotten 10 replys on why Win 7 's UAC is superior to Vista's, 10 counter replys to why Vista's sucks, 10 more on the pros and the 10 on the cons, 10 more discussing the creation of UAC, 10 on how it should be outlawed and Microsoft sued over putting it in, and at least 1 troll saying that if I was running Mac OS 10, I wouldn't have this problem. Out of all of the replys, maybe 1 would have a suggestion of a cure or work around.

You forgot the Linux fanboi reply: "Linux doesn't have these permission issues... and it's FREE!"

Obviously kona hasn't seen this... YET.

on Oct 18, 2009

More like if you use it and do it right you are ok. Doing things wrong and it will go wrong... till all drivers are signed properly things will go wrong for win7. Just as vista started out with just so much signed drivers. You will have to live with how you want to use uac. But my best suggestion is to use it - if a program does not run right ... reinstall it while logged into admin. There are some tweaks; but each to his own. Things are different for each machine and for each way you setup that machine.

UAC is needed; but how to completely use it is up to the user. So most do as you are " turn it off " . Thus making things work or so it seems they do. Really I think it delays the problems till a later time. So I really have no idea where to go on or off you have a os which reguires things you can't give it.

I just love the new os and the old. Never does everything but what it wants too. Fun with computing!

on Oct 18, 2009

You forgot the Linux fanboi reply: "Linux doesn't have these permission issues... and it's FREE!"

Obviously kona hasn't seen this... YET

I have. I choose not to reply. I'm not into Linux as much as you think.

on Oct 18, 2009

CarGuy1
I think Wizard had it right to begin with...


Useless AnnoyingCrap. 

I would say no.  In your case, something is obviously interfering with normal system operation...Steam loads up on startup fine on this box.

I know the only thing I've had that actually broke parts of Vista was MSIs mobo software updater...freaky thing.

on Oct 18, 2009

kona0197

You forgot the Linux fanboi reply: "Linux doesn't have these permission issues... and it's FREE!"

Obviously kona hasn't seen this... YET

I have. I choose not to reply. I'm not into Linux as much as you think.

Sorry, kona... no offense was intended.  It was intended purely as a bit of fun, as an add on jibe to CarGuy's thoughts on the MS forum... and your name affectionately came to mind when I thought of Linux.

   

 

on Oct 18, 2009

uac is a wasted feature. you didnt need it in windows xp or win 2000. it is microsofts lame attempt to be more like a mac os and hold your hand. turn it off entirely and be happy with your computer, otherwise win 7 is a remarkable os overall.

on Oct 19, 2009

uac is a wasted feature. you didnt need it in windows xp or win 2000. it is microsofts lame attempt to be more like a mac os and hold your hand. turn it off entirely and be happy with your computer, otherwise win 7 is a remarkable os overall.

Other than it's UI flaws.... 

on Oct 19, 2009

I'll leave UAC on myself.  I've heard plenty of people say the same thing about antivirus apps, but I'd rather be protected than end up with some foo halfway across the world knowing all my banking info.

on Oct 19, 2009

As Savyg said I also recommend leaving UAC on. I have to admit I have skipped Windows Vista, but Windows 7 UAC looks like it is doing a great job and it is not very annoying.

I only use Windows for gaming and the multimedia capabilities, for the rest I use a Linux distribution (Ubuntu at home, Fedora at work). In Linux you have to enter a password (yours our the root account) to install a program or do any stuff related to system configuration.

So from my point of view UAC is very permissive, you only have to press yes and search for some solutions on the internet when you hit some problems (usually at the software company that created the software).

on Oct 19, 2009

I always Leave UAC on, Its not too intrusive and Win7s is a huge improvement over Vistas.

The thing to remember with UAC is that it protects against anytype of autorunning Virus (USB viruses, Smitfrauds, etc), These are the same Viruses I see week after week in my repair shop. They are rather rare on vista+ machines as UAC tends to stop most of them (however you can't patch stupid, so you still see em sometimes).

on Oct 21, 2009

I do not recommend turning UAC completely off: There are benefits beyond that dialog box that you may not notice, but may prevent you from getting stung.

There is a workaround in Vista, and I'm sure it applies to 7 as well:

Use the the task scheduler.

Interestingly enough, the task scheduler starts as an elevated process and has the ability to create new elevated processes without prompts. Just add a task in there to load your programs with admin privileges at startup.

Just turn it off if you know what your doing, I did.

A Ph.D. security professional (who works at a nuclear power plant) lists a series of security maxims you should know about, here are a few:

So We’re In Agreement Maxim:  If you’re happy with your security, so are the bad guys.

Weakest Link Maxim: The efficacy of security is determined more by what is done wrong than by what is done right.

Ignorance is Bliss Maxim: The confidence that people have in security is inversely proportional to how much they know about it.

on Oct 21, 2009

All due respect Cobra and although the setttings may ring true in some cases, Win 7 is hardly a nuclear power plant.

 

Honestly.. when I finally start skinning 7, I'm turning it off just like i did in vista. I prefer not to have to hold Bill Gates' hand.

 

Most people can use simple common sense to protect themselves from anything that UAC would ever help them with, (so easy a caveman can do it) 

 

It's most certainly far more of an annoyance than it is a help imo.

on Oct 21, 2009

All due respect Cobra and although the setttings may ring true in some cases, Win 7 is hardly a nuclear power plant.

You're right, the systems he maintains are likely to be vastly more secure than any desktop OS in existence. He still warns vehemently about being arrogant and downgrading your security.

Most people can use simple common sense to protect themselves from anything that UAC would ever help them with

For example, most people know how to write security tokens and use them daily whenever a piece of software requests resources from the OS. Most people have written their own browser using protected mode. And oh, yeah, most people already know how to stop automated clicks by malware.

If you believe that UAC is just that prompt you see, you do not know what UAC is.

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